Hug Saves Lives a Drop at a Time

Ubie%2C+the+Blood+Drive+Mascot

R. Field

Ubie, the Blood Drive Mascot

The first week of November at Hug High School marks HOSA (Future Health Care Professionals) Week, a week to celebrate the program and what it represents. Kicking off the week is a blood drive, which will be held on Monday, November 4th in the small gym. Anyone who is able to donate is encouraged to do so. A donor needs to be at least 16 years old with parents’ permission, 17 years old and up does not need parental permission.  

There are two types of blood donation appointments being offered: whole blood and double red cells (also known as apheresis donation or power red donation). A whole blood donation is when blood is collected from a donor and is later separated into its various components for a transfusion (this takes around 10 or 15 minutes).

In a double red cell transfusion, twice the amount of blood is taken, but only the red blood cells are kept. The blood components are separated, the red cells are taken, and the other blood components are returned to the donor (this takes anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours).   

According to the American Red Cross, one blood donation can save up to three lives. With someone needing blood every 2 seconds in the United States, the need for blood is never satisfied. “Donating blood is an excellent way to help the community.” said Mrs. Osterhage, lead HOSA advisor of the Hug High School HOSA chapter.

This year’s HOSA national service project is pediatric cancer, and donating blood is very important to helping the kids”

— Mrs. Osterhage

To sign up for the blood drive online, the link is: https://www.bloodhero.com/index.cfm?group=op&expand=875286&zc=89512. The paperwork for parental consent and other sign up forms can be picked up in Mrs. Osterhage’s room: IA-11. 

The blood drive goes hand-in-hand with the spirit of HOSA: helping the community. “This year’s HOSA national service project is pediatric cancer, and donating blood is very important to helping the kids.” said Mrs. Osterhage. Every day of HOSA week there is a dress up day, Monday is dress like a superhero day. “We are encouraging students and teachers to dress up in their best superhero costumes, because donating blood, in a way, is kind of like being a superhero.” said Mrs. Osterhage.